Demonstration version 1.4

Analyses



This section illustrates the analytics that the WHO Global Observatory on Health R&D will allow in the near future. It provides the opportunity to compare for different health issues: the amount of R&D funding, the number of products in the R&D pipeline, and the number of publications being produced. At this stage, most of the analyses in this section are static; in the future users will be able to modify the graphs (e.g. selecting which health issues are displayed). The first graph under R&D funding already provides an example of such functionalities.

R&D funding

According to analyses by Policy Cures’ G-FINDER survey, a total of 850 million US Dollars were spent in 2014 on R&D for new products for neglected diseases. In the graph, you can compare how much R&D funding different health issues received. Note that by clicking the “Advanced settings” button, you can modify which health issues are displayed in the graph. You can also modify other settings of the graph to further explore the data and you can save the modified graph by printing the page or exporting the image of the graph.

Funding for R&D for selected health issues

In the graph below, the data from Policy Cures' G-FINDER survey are displayed again, but are now compared to the burden of disease of several of the health issues included in the G-FINDER survey. Note that caution is warranted in interpreting comparisons of research funding for health issues to the burden these health issues pose. While the public health burden of a health issue is an important factor in determining whether that issue constitutes a research priority or not, many other factors play a role: the need for new knowledge and products, the state of the relevant science and technology, and disease trends (e.g. new epidemics or approaching elimination of a disease) also affect the need for research on a health issue. Moreover, sometimes some research areas are neglected for a health issue, whereas other areas are not (e.g. for HIV, vaccines and paediatric medicines receive significantly less attention than medicines for adults). Please see the User Guide for more detail. Burden of disease is expressed as disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from WHO's Global Health Observatory from 2012. This metric quantifies the number of healthy years of life lost due to morbidity or premature mortality caused by disease; one DALY represents the loss of the equivalent of one year of full health.



Note: the data from Policy Cures' G-FINDER survey are limited to funding for product development for diseases that A) disproportionately affect people in developing countries, B) for which there is a need for new products, and C) for which there is market failure in developing these new products. For several diseases, only R&D funding for developing country specific serotypes/strains or products are included, while the displayed burden of disease is the global burden of disease. See the User Guide for more information on Policy Cures' G-FINDER survey.

R&D pipeline

The graphs below display the number of products in development for different health issues. Different data sources provide R&D pipeline data for different health issues. Therefore, the graph below is developed using data from Medicines for Malaria Venture, BIO Ventures for Global Health, the Pew Charitable Trusts and the World Health Organization. For drugs and vaccines, the numbers below include products in clinical development only. For diagnostics, the numbers below include products in any stage of development. For more information on these data sources and the health issues they provide R&D pipeline information on, as well as the reasons why all stages of development have been included for diagnostics, please see the User Guide.





Clinical trials

The graphs below shed light on the distribution of clinical trials across different health issues and countries. The first graph shows how many clinical trials were registered in the year 2014. The second graph shows how many clinical trials were registered in every year since 2005 to recruit participants in each of the six UN regions.

About the WHO ICTRP: the WHO ICTRP is the most inclusive global data source on clinical trials; it combines data from 16 clinical trials registries around the world.



Note: The graphs include both trials that are recruiting participants and trials that are not. More information on the search methodology and classifications used to develop these graphs can be found in the User Guide of the WHO Global Observatory on Health R&D. These data were last updated on 29 April 2016.

Publications

The graph below displays the number of publications on PubMed over time for different health issues. Please see the User Guide for more information on the methodology and search terms used to develop this graph.



In the graph below, the data from PubMed are displayed again, but are now compared to the burden of disease of the health issues. Note that caution is warranted in interpreting comparisons of the number of publications for health issues to the burden these health issues pose. While the public health burden of a health issue is an important factor in determining whether that issue constitutes a research priority or not, many other factors play a role. Please see the text above under R&D funding for more detail. Burden of disease is expressed as disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from GBD from 2012. This metric quantifies the number of healthy years of life lost due to morbidity or premature mortality caused by disease; one DALY represents the loss of the equivalent of one year of full health.


The WHO Global Observatory on Health R&D is an open data platform that provides access to data that have mostly been developed by other data sources. WHO provides access to these data, but the data are not necessarily endorsed by WHO. There are several other limitations to the data, in particular that different data sources may use different definitions and classification systems (as a result, data from different data sources are not always easily comparable). More information about the limitations of the data on this platform can be found in the WHO Global Observatory on Health R&D User Guide. All use of the WHO Global Observatory on Health Research and Development (R&D) is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use.